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CORIBE is advancing . . . two important premises: 1) Education is a basic human right

 and 2) Humane and equitable education for and about Black people is a condition

of humane and equitable education, justice and human freedom for all.

 

 

 Books by Joyce E. King

 

Black Education / Preparing Teachers for Cultural Diversity / Teaching Diverse Populations

 Black Mothers to Sons: Juxtaposing African American Literature with Social Practice.

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Black Education

A Transformative Research and Action Agenda for the New Century

Edited by Joyce E. King

 

Reviews

 

Once we learn to teach poor Black children, we will likely learn better how to educate all childrenCarol D. Lee, from Chapter 3 "The State of Knowledge about the Education of African Americans"

 

This volume and the effort of the Commission on Research in Black Education (CORIBE) . . . disrupts the discourse of Black inferiority and . . . suggests that the strengths tahta re already present and are ripe for development among Black peoples are gifts that humankind the world over so desperately needs . . . . By blurring the artificially constructed lines between research and practice CORIBE has produced a volume that speaks to multiple audiences in multiple ways. It provides a "grammar" of Black education unlike anything mainstream research has ever seen.Gloria Ladson-Billings, University of Wisconsin/Madison, from the Foreword

 

This volume presents the findings and recommendations of the American Educational Research Association's (AERA) Commission on Research in Black Education (CORIBE) and offers new directions for research and practice. By commissioning an independent group of scholars of diverse perspectives and voices to investigate major issues hindering the education of Black people in the U.S., other Diaspora contexts, and Africa, the AERA sought to place issues of Black education and research practice in the forefront of the agenda of the scholarly community. An unprecedented critical challenge to orthodox thinking, this book makes an epistemological break with mainstream scholarship. 

Contributors present research on proven solutionsbest practicesthat prepare Black students and others to achieve at high levels of academic excellence and to be agents of their own socioeconomic and cultural transformation. These analyses and empirical findings also link the crisis in Black education to embedded ideological biases in research and the system of thought that often justifies the abject state of Black education.

Written for both a scholarly and a general audience, this book demonstrates a transformative role for research and a positive role for culture in learning, in the academy, and in community and cross-national contexts.

Volume editor Joyce E. King is the Benjamin E. Mays Endowed Chair of Urban Teaching, learning, and leadership at Georgia State University and was chair of CORIBEPublisher, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.

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Contents

Foreword

xiii

Acknowledgements

xix

Preface

xxi

Part I Theorizing Transformative Black Education Research and Practice

1

     1 A Transformative Vision of Black Education for Human Freedom

3

Joyce E. King
     2 A Declaration of Intellectual Independence for Human Freedom

19

Joyce E. King
Part II Taking Culture into Account: Learning Theory and Black Education

43

     3 The State of Knowledge about the education of African Americans

45

Carol D. Lee
     4 Intervening Research Based on Current Views of Cognition and Learning
Carol D. Lee

73

Part III Expanding the Knowledgeable in Black Education and Research 
Globally

115

     5 Colonial Education in Africa: Retrospects and Prospects

117

William H. Watkins
     6 Black Populations Globally: The Costs of the Underutilization of Blacks In Education

135

Kassie Freeman
Part IV Engaging the Language and Policy Nexus in African Education

157

     7 When the Language of Education Is Not the Language of Culture: The Epistemology  
of Systems of Knowledge and Pedagogy

159

Hassimi Oumarou Maiga
     8 Initiating Transformations of Realities in African and African American Universities

183

Beverly Lindsay
Part V Situating Equity Policy and Pedagogy in the Political Economic Context

195

 
     9  New Standards and old Inequalities: School Reform and the Education of African 
American Students

197

Linda Darling-Hammond
     10 On the Road to Democratic Economic Participation: Educating African American Youth 
in the Postindustrial Global Economy

225

Jessica Gordon Nembhard
Part VI Humanizing Education: Diverse Voices

241

     11 A Detroit Conversation

243

Joyce E. King and Sharon Parker, Editors
     12 Faith and Courage to Educate Our Own: Reflections on Islamic Schools in the African
American Community

261

Zakiyyah Muhammad
Part VII Globalizing the struggle for Black Education: 
African and Diaspora Experience

281

     13 Worldwide Conspiracy Against Black Culture and Education

285

Ibrahima Seck
     14 Black Educational Experiences in Britain: 
Reflections on the Global Educational Landscape

291

Cecile Wright
     15 Black People and Brazilian Education

297

Terezinha Juraci Machado da Silva
     16 A New Millennium Research Agenda in Black Education: Some Points to Be
Considered fro Discussion and Decisions

301

Petronilha Beatriz Gonçalves e Silva
Part VIII "Ore Ire" -- Catalyzing Transformation in the Academy:
Our Charge to Keep

309

     17 Culturally Sensitive Research and Evaluation: 
Advancing an Agenda for Black Education

313

Linda C. Tillman
     18 "Anayme Nti"--As Long As I Am Alive, I Will Never Eat Weeds:
The Online Institute as a Catalyst for Research and Action in Black Education

323

Annette Henry
     19 Incidents in the Lives of Harriet Jacob's Children--A Readers Theatre:
Disseminating the Outcomes of Research on the Black Experience in the Academy

329

Cirecie A. West-Olatunji
     20 Answering a Call for Transformative Education in the New Millennium--
"A Charge to Keep"; The CORIBE Documentary Video

341

Djanna Hill
Afterword 

347

Postscript

351

Appendix A     A Transformative Research and Action Agenda for Human Freedom
in the New Century

353

Appendix B-1     Black Education, Toward the Human, After "Man":
in the Manner of a Manifesto

357

Appendix B-2     Race and Our Biocentric Belief System: 
An Interview with Sylvia Wynter

361

Appendix C     A Glossary of Terms

367

Contributing Authors

371

References

377

Author Index

421

Subject Index

431

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Dr. Joyce E. King is the Benjamin E. Mays Chair of Urban Teaching, Learning, and Leadership in the College of Education at Georgia State University. 

The former Provost and Professor of Education at Spelman College, King is recognized here and abroad for her contributions to the field of education. In addition to Black Education, a publication which she edited, Dr. King has published three other booksPreparing Teachers for Cultural Diversity, Teaching Diverse Populations and Black Mothers to Sons: Juxtaposing African American Literature with Social Practice.

She has published many articles as well that address the role of cultural knowledge in effective teaching and teacher preparation, black teachers’ emancipatory pedagogy, research methods, black studies epistemology and curriculum change. King is a graduate of Stanford University where she received a Doctor of Philosophy degree in social foundations and a Bachelor of Arts degree in sociology. She also holds a certificate from the Harvard Institute in educational management. Click to purchase Black Education. There is also a video documentary

posted 22 July 2008

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Zippety Doo Dah, Zippety-Ay: How Satisfactch'll Is Education Today? Toward a New Song of the South

Dr. Joyce E. King on Black Education and New Paradigms

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Privatizing Education: The Neoliberal Project

Black Education and Afro-Pessimism / The Collapse of Urban Public Schooling  / The Myth of Charter Schools

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The White Architects of Black Education

Ideology and Power in America, 1865-1954

By William Watkins

William H. Watkins is subtle in his story of the “white architects” who developed Black education beginning in 1865, just at the end of the Civil War. Watkins shocks you with his “scientific racism” platform that he explains “presented human difference as the rational for inequality” and that it “can be understood as an ideological and political issue” (pg. 39). The reader senses a calm attitude about the author as he speaks of the philanthropists, beginning with John D. Rockefeller, Sr, who was most concerned about “shaping the new industrial social order” (pg. 133) than he was for providing a useful education. “The Rockefeller group demonstrated how gift giving could shape education and public policy” (pg. 134).

 In their support of Black education, by 1964, the General Education Board (GEB) spent more than $3.2 million dollars in gifts to support Black education. This captivating book begins with a foreword written by Robin D.G. Kelley who reflects that he learned one lesson from Watkins, “If we are to create new models of pedagogy and intellectual work and become architects of our own education, then we cannot simply repair the structures that have been passed down to us. We need to dismantle the old architecture so that we might begin anew” (pg. xiii). Why don’t the school reformers who mandate educational laws experience such an awakening?Review by AC Snow

Source: Cre3Design

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music website > http://www.kalamu.com/bol/
writing website > http://wordup.posterous.com/
daily blog > http://kalamu.posterous.com
twitter > http://twitter.com/neogriot
facebook > http://www.facebook.com/kalamu.salaam

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Men We Love, Men We Hate  / Ways of Laughing (Kalamu ya Salaam)

The State of African Education (April 200)

Attack On Africans Writing Their Own History Part 1 of 7

Dr Asa Hilliard III speaks on the assault of academia on Africans writing and accounting for their own history.

Dr Hilliard is A teacher, psychologist, and historian.

Part 2 of 7  /  Part 3 of 7  / Part 4 of 7  / Part 5 of 7 / Part 6 of 7  /  Part 7 of 7

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Basil Davidson obituary—By Victoria Brittain—9 July 2010—Davidson [(9 November 1914 – 9 July 2010) a British historian, writer and Africanist] was enthused early on by the end of British colonialism and the prospects of pan-Africanism in the 1960s, and he wrote copiously and with warmth about newly independent Ghana and its leader, Kwame Nkrumah. He went to work for a year at the University of Accra in 1964. Later he threw himself into the reporting of the African liberation wars in the Portuguese colonies, particularly in Angola, Mozambique, Cape Verde and Guinea-Bissau. . . . In the 1980s, with most of the African liberation wars now won—except for South Africa's— Davidson turned much of his attention to more theoretical questions about the future of the nation state in Africa. He remained a passionate advocate of pan-Africanism. In 1988 he made a long and dangerous journey into Eritrea, writing a persuasive defence of the nationalists' right to independence from Ethiopia, and an equally eloquent attack on the revolutionary leader Colonel Mengistu and the regime that had overthrown Haile Selassie. Guardian

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Basil Davidson's  "Africa Series"

 Different But Equal  /  Mastering A Continent  /  Caravans of Gold  / The King and the City / The Bible and The Gun

West Africa Before the Colonial Era: A History to 1850

African Slave Trade: Precolonial History, 1450-1850

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John Henrik Clarke—A Great and Mighty Walk

The Katrina Papers a Journal of Trauma and Recovery (Jerry W. Ward, Jr.)

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The White Architects of Black Education

Ideology and Power in America, 1865-1954

By William Watkins

William H. Watkins is subtle in his story of the “white architects” who developed Black education beginning in 1865, just at the end of the Civil War. Watkins shocks you with his “scientific racism” platform that he explains “presented human difference as the rational for inequality” and that it “can be understood as an ideological and political issue” (pg. 39). The reader senses a calm attitude about the author as he speaks of the philanthropists, beginning with John D. Rockefeller, Sr, who was most concerned about “shaping the new industrial social order” (pg. 133) than he was for providing a useful education. “The Rockefeller group demonstrated how gift giving could shape education and public policy” (pg. 134).

 In their support of Black education, by 1964, the General Education Board (GEB) spent more than $3.2 million dollars in gifts to support Black education. This captivating book begins with a foreword written by Robin D.G. Kelley who reflects that he learned one lesson from Watkins, “If we are to create new models of pedagogy and intellectual work and become architects of our own education, then we cannot simply repair the structures that have been passed down to us. We need to dismantle the old architecture so that we might begin anew” (pg. xiii). Why don’t the school reformers who mandate educational laws experience such an awakening?Review by AC Snow

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AALBC.com's 25 Best Selling Books


 

Fiction

#1 - Justify My Thug by Wahida Clark
#2 - Flyy Girl by Omar Tyree
#3 - Head Bangers: An APF Sexcapade by Zane
#4 - Life Is Short But Wide by J. California Cooper
#5 - Stackin' Paper 2 Genesis' Payback by Joy King
#6 - Thug Lovin' (Thug 4) by Wahida Clark
#7 - When I Get Where I'm Going by Cheryl Robinson
#8 - Casting the First Stone by Kimberla Lawson Roby
#9 - The Sex Chronicles: Shattering the Myth by Zane

#10 - Covenant: A Thriller  by Brandon Massey

#11 - Diary Of A Street Diva  by Ashley and JaQuavis

#12 - Don't Ever Tell  by Brandon Massey

#13 - For colored girls who have considered suicide  by Ntozake Shange

#14 - For the Love of Money : A Novel by Omar Tyree

#15 - Homemade Loves  by J. California Cooper

#16 - The Future Has a Past: Stories by J. California Cooper

#17 - Player Haters by Carl Weber

#18 - Purple Panties: An Eroticanoir.com Anthology by Sidney Molare

#19 - Stackin' Paper by Joy King

#20 - Children of the Street: An Inspector Darko Dawson Mystery by Kwei Quartey

#21 - The Upper Room by Mary Monroe

#22 – Thug Matrimony  by Wahida Clark

#23 - Thugs And The Women Who Love Them by Wahida Clark

#24 - Married Men by Carl Weber

#25 - I Dreamt I Was in Heaven - The Rampage of the Rufus Buck Gang by Leonce Gaiter

Non-fiction

#1 - Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention by Manning Marable
#2 - Confessions of a Video Vixen by Karrine Steffans
#3 - Dear G-Spot: Straight Talk About Sex and Love by Zane
#4 - Letters to a Young Brother: MANifest Your Destiny by Hill Harper
#5 - Peace from Broken Pieces: How to Get Through What You're Going Through by Iyanla Vanzant
#6 - Selected Writings and Speeches of Marcus Garvey by Marcus Garvey
#7 - The Ebony Cookbook: A Date with a Dish by Freda DeKnight
#8 - The Isis Papers: The Keys to the Colors by Frances Cress Welsing
#9 - The Mis-Education of the Negro by Carter Godwin Woodson

#10 - John Henrik Clarke and the Power of Africana History  by Ahati N. N. Toure

#11 - Fail Up: 20 Lessons on Building Success from Failure by Tavis Smiley

#12 -The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

#13 - The Black Male Handbook: A Blueprint for Life by Kevin Powell

#14 - The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates by Wes Moore

#15 - Why Men Fear Marriage: The Surprising Truth Behind Why So Many Men Can't Commit  by RM Johnson

#16 - Black Titan: A.G. Gaston and the Making of a Black American Millionaire by Carol Jenkins

#17 - Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth of Black Inferiority by Tom Burrell

#18 - A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose by Eckhart Tolle

#19 - John Oliver Killens: A Life of Black Literary Activism by Keith Gilyard

#20 - Alain L. Locke: The Biography of a Philosopher by Leonard Harris

#21 - Age Ain't Nothing but a Number: Black Women Explore Midlife by Carleen Brice

#22 - 2012 Guide to Literary Agents by Chuck Sambuchino
#23 - Chicken Soup for the Prisoner's Soul by Tom Lagana
#24 - 101 Things Every Boy/Young Man of Color Should Know by LaMarr Darnell Shields

#25 - Beyond the Black Lady: Sexuality and the New African American Middle Class  by Lisa B. Thompson

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The White Architects of Black Education

Ideology and Power in America, 1865-1954

By William Watkins

William H. Watkins is subtle in his story of the “white architects” who developed Black education beginning in 1865, just at the end of the Civil War. Watkins shocks you with his “scientific racism” platform that he explains “presented human difference as the rational for inequality” and that it “can be understood as an ideological and political issue” (pg. 39). The reader senses a calm attitude about the author as he speaks of the philanthropists, beginning with John D. Rockefeller, Sr, who was most concerned about “shaping the new industrial social order” (pg. 133) than he was for providing a useful education. “The Rockefeller group demonstrated how gift giving could shape education and public policy” (pg. 134).

 In their support of Black education, by 1964, the General Education Board (GEB) spent more than $3.2 million dollars in gifts to support Black education. This captivating book begins with a foreword written by Robin D.G. Kelley who reflects that he learned one lesson from Watkins, “If we are to create new models of pedagogy and intellectual work and become architects of our own education, then we cannot simply repair the structures that have been passed down to us. We need to dismantle the old architecture so that we might begin anew” (pg. xiii). Why don’t the school reformers who mandate educational laws experience such an awakening?Review by AC Snow

*   *   *   *   *

The Death and Life of the Great American School System

How Testing and Choice Are Undermining Education

By Diane Ravitch

As an education historian and former assistant secretary of education, Ravitch has witnessed the trends in public education over the past 40 years and has herself swung from public-school advocate to market-driven accountability and choice supporter back to public-school advocate. With passion and insight, she analyzes research and draws on interviews with educators, philanthropists, and business executives to question the current direction of reform of public education. In the mid-1990s, the movement to boost educational standards failed on political concerns; next came the emphasis on accountability with its reliance on standardized testing. Now educators are worried that the No Child Left Behind mandate that all students meet proficiency standards by 2014 will result in the dismantling of public schools across the nation. Ravitch analyzes the impact of choice on public schools, attempts to quantify quality teaching, and describes the data wars with advocates for charter and traditional public schools.

Ravitch also critiques the continued reliance on a corporate model for school reform and the continued failure of such efforts to emphasize curriculum. Conceding that there is no single solution, Ravitch concludes by advocating for strong educational values and revival of strong neighborhood public schools. For readers on all sides of the school-reform debate, this is a very important book.—Vanessa Bush   

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Whatever It Takes

Geoffrey Canada's Quest to Change Harlem and America

By Paul Tough

What would it take? That was the question that Geoffrey Canada found himself asking. What would it take to change the lives of poor children—not one by one, through heroic interventions and occasional miracles, but in big numbers, and in a way that could be replicated nationwide? The question led him to create the Harlem Children's Zone, a ninety-seven-block laboratory in central Harlem where he is testing new and sometimes controversial ideas about poverty in America. His conclusion: if you want poor kids to be able to compete with their middle-class peers, you need to change everything in their lives—their schools, their neighborhoods, even the child-rearing practices of their parents. Whatever It Takes is a tour de force of reporting, an inspired portrait not only of Geoffrey Canada but also of the parents and children in Harlem who are struggling to better their lives, often against great odds. Carefully researched and deeply affecting, this is a dispatch from inside the most daring and potentially transformative social experiment of our time.

Paul Tough is an editor at the New York Times Magazine and one of America's foremost writers on poverty, education, and the achievement gap. His reporting on Geoffrey Canada and the Harlem

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The White Masters of the World

From The World and Africa, 1965

By W. E. B. Du Bois

W. E. B. Du Bois’ Arraignment and Indictment of White Civilization (Fletcher)

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Ancient African Nations

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Negro Digest / Black World

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Enjoy!

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The Death of Emmett Till by Bob Dylan  The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll  Only a Pawn in Their Game

Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson Thanks America for Slavery

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The Journal of Negro History issues at Project Gutenberg

The Haitian Declaration of Independence 1804  / January 1, 1804 -- The Founding of Haiti 

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update 4 June 2012

 

 

 

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Related files: l   Black Education    Ten Vital Principles for Black Education   Afterword    Joyce King Commentary     My Mother Was a Maid 

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