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 Remembering Chick Webb (died 16 June 1939, at 30)

 

The Chick Webb Memorial Index

Page for Music & Musicians

 Stompin' at the Savoy   /  Swing Sation Series   /  Rhythm Man  /  Tain't What You Do

Don't talk about it / Be about it: Last Friday, Mos Def was outside of the VMA's (Video Music Awards) rapping his Katrina song, and he was arrested by the NYPD." His tune can found at Dollar Day--Katrina Klap   /  A History of African American Music

What to Do with "Deception and Deviltry” (Lewis) / Community Organizer vs. Corrupt Politician  (Dixon) /  Wilson's Obama Poem   Responses to Obama Winning

1959: The Year that  Changed Jazz—1959. It was a pivotal year for jazz. Musicians started breaking away from bebop, exploring new, experimental forms. And four absolutely canonical LPs were recorded that year: Kind of Blue by Miles Davis; Time Out by Dave Brubeck; Mingus Ah Um by Charles Mingus; and The Shape of Jazz to Come by Ornette Coleman. 1959 also found America on the cusp of great social and political upheaval. Integration, Vietnam, the Cuban Missile Crisis—they were all coming around the bend, and sometimes figures like Mingus and Coleman commented musically on these events. This transformative period gets nicely covered by the recent BBC documentary, 1959: The Year that Changed Jazz. The outtake above focuses on Ornette Coleman and his innovative work as a free jazz musician. . . The documentary featuring interviews with Brubeck, Coleman, Lou Reed, and Herbie Hancock is available in four parts: Part 1, Part 2Part 3 and Part 4. It runs roughly 60 minutes.—openculture

Remembering Etta James

 

Compiled by Rudolph Lewis

Taj Mahal—Stagger Lee  /  The Neo-African Americans  /  Fatoumata Diawara—Bissa  /  Origins of the Moonwalk Judge Mathis  on the execution of Troy Davis 

Black Artists on the Chittlin Circuit

Chattanooga, Tennessee

Samuel Cook, (January 22, 1931 – December 11, 1964), better known under the stage name Sam Cooke, was an American gospel, R&B, soul, and pop singer, songwriter, and entrepreneur. He is considered to be one of the pioneers and founders of soul music. He is commonly known as the King of Soul for his distinctive vocal abilities and influence on the modern world of music. His contribution in pioneering soul music led to the rise of Aretha Franklin, Bobby Womack, Al Green, Curtis Mayfield, Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, and popularized the likes of Otis Redding and James Brown. . . . On December 11, 1964, Cooke was fatally shot by the manager of the Hacienda Motel in Los Angeles, California, at the age of 33. At the time, the courts ruled that Cooke was drunk and distressed, and that the manager had killed Cooke in what was later ruled a justifiable homicide. Since that time, the circumstances of his death have been widely questioned.—Wikipedia

Jack Leroy "Jackie" Wilson, Jr. (June 9, 1934 – January 21, 1984) was an American singer and performer. Known as "Mr. Excitement", Wilson was important in the transition of rhythm and blues into soul. He was considered a master showman, one of the most dynamic and influential singers and performers in R&B and rock history. Gaining fame in his early years as a member of the R&B vocal group Billy Ward and His Dominoes, he went solo in 1957 and recorded over 50 hit singles that spanned R&B, pop, soul, doo-wop and easy listening. During a 1975 benefit concert, he collapsed on-stage from a heart attack and subsequently fell into a coma that persisted for nearly nine years until his death in 1984.Wikipedia

The hand of a child cannot reach the ledge; the hand of the elder cannot enter the gourd: both the young and the old have what each can do for the other—Yoruba Proverb

 

Blues at the White House

An Introduction by President Barack Obama

Howard Dodson, Jr. Named Director

of Moorland-Spingarn and Howard University Libraries

 ameriKKKa is nonreligious (Orisha Kammefa) / We Will Always Love You Whitney  (Poem by Marvin X) / The Return of Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala (Ugochukwu Ejinkeonye)

Rev Shuttlesworth Story  /  Fred Shuttlesworth: My Relationship with Martin Luther King, Jr.  /  Fred Shuttlesworth Overview  /  Fred Shuttlesworth: Stopping at Nothing for Equal Rights

John Coltrane Stuttgart 1963

By Kalamu ya Salaam

This is the quantum physics of jazz—music of explosive power that shatters preconceptions and forces whole new formulations of what the music can and should sound like. All who knew Coltrane describe him as a gentle man, and no one ever described him as angry or “militant.” Coltrane’s music however, especially during the sixties, was often anything but gentle, and because of the stylistic firestorm he created, Trane was often accused of destroying the basis of modern jazz. In fact, articles and interviews in Downbeat, the leading jazz magazine of Coltrane’s era, sometimes described Coltrane’s music as “anti-jazz.” Had Coltrane not had a profound influence on numerous musicians, the controversy about his music would have been personal and limited, much as was the situation with critical and popular reactions to saxophonist Albert Ayler. Coltrane however was revered as an innovator (some argued "genius") and leader of the sixties avant garde movement in jazz.Coltrane championed many younger musicians. Archie Shepp and Pharoah Sanders are two in particular who went on to have long and important careers following their introduction to wider audiences by John Coltrane. more  / Coltrane Complete Live in Stuttgart 1963

 Music & Other Reviews (Amin Sharif)

AfriClassical.com: Song of a New Race         Arturo Sandoval in Baltimore       Muddy Waters on PBS

Blue Note: A History of Modern Jazz             Good Looks          A Blues for the Birmingham Four     God's Trombones

Black man descending: On Mike Tyson   /  Ugliness in the Beautiful Game

The Natural Mystics: Marley, Tosh, and Wailer

By Colin Grant

The definitive group biography of the Wailers—Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, and Bunny Livingston—chronicling their rise to fame and power. Over one dramatic decade, a trio of Trenchtown R&B crooners swapped their 1960s Brylcreem hairdos and two-tone suits for 1970s battle fatigues and dreadlocks to become the Wailers—one of the most influential groups in popular music. Colin Grant presents a lively history of this remarkable band from their upbringing in the brutal slums of Kingston to their first recordings and then international superstardom. With energetic prose and stunning, original research, Grant argues that these reggae stars offered three models for black men in the second half of the twentieth century: accommodate and succeed (Marley), fight and die (Tosh), or retreat and live (Livingston). Grant meets with Rastafarian elders, Obeah men (witch doctors), and other folk authorities as he attempts to unravel the mysteries of Jamaica's famously impenetrable culture. Much more than a top-flight music biography, The Natural Mystics offers a sophisticated understanding of Jamaican politics, heritage, race, and religion—a portrait of a seminal group during a period of exuberant cultural evolution. 8 pages of four-color and 8 pages of black-and-white illustrations. Colin Grant Interview, The Natural Mystics

My Song: A Memoir

By Harry Belafonte with Michael Shnayerson

Here is a gorgeous account of the large life of a Harlem boy, son of a Jamaican cleaning lady, Melvine Love, and a ship’s cook, Harold Bellan­fanti, who endured the grind of poverty under the watchful eye of his proud mother and waited for his chances, prepared to be lucky, and made himself into the international calypso star and popular folk singer, huge in Las Vegas, also Europe, and a mainstay of the civil rights movement of the ’60s. . . His mother found refuge in the Catholic Church. The Holy Roller preachers of her native Jamaica were “too niggerish” for her. She loved the marble majesty of Catholicism and sent the boy off to parochial school to suffer at the hands of the nuns and took him to Mass every Sunday, dressed in a blue suit, and afterward to the Apollo Theater to hear Cab Calloway or Count Basie or Duke Ellington, Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald. . . . Dr. King is one strong strand in My Song; another is Belafonte’s family saga through three marriages with four children; another is his inner life, psycho­analysis, the wounds of childhood, his gambling addiction; another, the oddity of show business, the casual flings, the personal manager who turned out to be an F.B.I. informer. Indelible characters pass by: Sidney Poitier, Eleanor Roosevelt, James Baldwin, Bob Dylan, Fidel Castro, Miriam Makeba.NYTimes

The Complexity of Iraq   /  Islam Needs a Martin Luther  / London Bridges Falling Down  (Responses) /  Open Letter to Dr. Hussein Shahristani / My Son The Fanatic

The Fourth World and the Marxists   Letters from Young Activists   Lessons from France   Paris Is Burning  "The Pyres of Autumn" Responses to Jean Baudrillard   Geraldine Robinson  remembers The Family of Cow Tom :The Connection of Africans &  the Civilized Tribes

Ice: A Memoir of Gangster Life and Redemptionfrom South Central to Hollywood

By Ice-T and Douglas Century

In this intriguing memoir, groundbreaking rapper and actor Ice-T chronicles his rise from nomadic criminal to hip-hop star. After losing both parents by the age of 12, Tracy Marrow was shipped to relatives in Los Angeles where he navigated the growing gang culture of the city and became a father at 18. A four-year tour in the army was followed by a lucrative interlude robbing jewelry and clothing stores. As his fellow thieves began to file off to prison, Ice-T turned to the nascent rap scene and scored immediate success. Continuing to reinvent himself, Ice-T went on to front a rock band and also was one of the first rap figures to work in film and television. There™s little focus on the music itself, but rather on his careers and his observations on the various subcultures he passes through. What lifts the book above the general run of entertainer memoirs is the quality of these observations—Ice-T is a canny businessman, and he charts clearly the decisions that brought him up each step of a very treacherous ladder.Publishers Weekly / Ice-T's Memoir On Gangsta Life And Redemption: As Cool As The Author—These days, Ice-T is in his second decade as a star of NBC's Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, where the one-time law-breaker again is portraying a member of law enforcement. He also speaks to inmates and at colleges around the country.HuffingtonPost

 Speeches & Sermons:   -- The American Dream is Under Siege at Home (Bill Clinton) / Time to Take Back the Country We Love (Hillary Clinton)

The America George Bush Has Left Us (Joe Biden) / We Must Listen and Lead by Example (John Kerry)  / Seize this Opportunity for Change (Al Gore)

Conscious hip hop, the soundtrack to young politics in the UK—This is the music that is mobilising Britain's youth and getting them to think about issues they might not otherwise have done—By Richard Sudan—Differing from the often violent image that rap has been tarnished with, conscious hip-hop is generally the opposite of what is marketed and supported by corporate labels. As London-based rapper Lowkey, one of the best-known figures on the scene, puts it in a track entitled "My Soul": "They can't use my music to advertise for Coca Cola / they can't use my music to advertise for Motorola / they can't use my music to advertise for anything / I guess that's reason the industry won't let me in / refuse to be a product or a brand I'm a human / refuse to contribute to the gangsta illusion." In short, conscious rap is hip-hop as it should be. Many people know of US conscious rappers such as Dead Prez KRS-One and Immortal Technique. But how is it relevant to activism here in the UK? US professor and author MK Asante Jr argues that hip-hop simply means "making an observation [about society] and having an obligation."Guardian / Long Live Palestine (Lowkey) / Logic—For My People

Martin Luther King Jr. on Malcolm X  /  NGOs, an extension of US foreign policyBaby Doc Duvalier returns to Haiti  /  After Midnight—Coleman Hawkins

Pharoah SandersThe Gathering  /  Pharoah Sanders:Heart (Love) is a Melody of Time  / The President's House: Freedom and Slavery

Stevie Wonder—Ribbon in the Sky /  Stevie Wonder—Ribbon in the Sky2

Stevie Wonder with Aretha Franklin—Until You Come Back to Me 

Stevie Wonder (13 May 1950)—A big Happy Birthday goes out to singer Stevland Hardaway Morris also known as Stevie Wonder!  He's turned sixty-one.  Although he’s not an actor, the Michigan native’s music has appeared on an endless list of film and TV productions.  A few on that list. . . . The Woman in Red, The Last Dragon, Fame, School Daze, Round Midnight, Designing Women, Poetic Justice, Mulan, How Stella Got Her Groove Back, Glee, The West Wing, The Wire, Next Friday, The Best Man, Wild Wild West, The Outsiders, Shrek Forever After, Valentine’s Day, and much more.  He also composed the complete soundtrack and film score for Spike Lee‘s film Jungle Fever.

Remembering Jim Crow / Abbey Lincoln—Africa / John Coltrane—Africa 1/2 / John Coltane—Africa 2/2 / Peter Tosh—Mama AfricaDr. Alban—Born in Africa

A Question of Color  /  Albert Camus—The Absurd  /  Albert Camus  /   I Just Want You Around  /  Lauryn Hill—Ex-Factor  /  The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill

A Short History of Five Notes

This is the story of a five note rhythm that has changed musical history. Originally carried by slaves from Africa to the Caribbean hundreds of years ago, these five notes have become part of the DNA of modern music—influencing everything from soul and Cuban music, to afrobeat and rock and roll.In “A Short History of Five Notes” for the BBC World Service, music journalist Rita Ray traces the history of the five notes back to their origins in West Africa, visiting traditional drummers in Ghana.he also hears from legendary Latin, soul and rock musicians from around the world, including The Animals lead singer Eric Burdon, Cuban jazz pianist Omar Sosa, James Brown's drummer Jabo Starks, and Fela Kuti conga player JB Korantang Crentisl. View a click map showing where the five notes have influenced the music.  History of Five Notes mp3 / short_history_five_notes / In Search of Fela Kuti

African Rhythms: The Autobiography of Randy Weston

Composed by Randy Weston; Arranged by Willard Jenkins

The pianist, composer, and bandleader Randy Weston is one of the world’s most influential jazz musicians and a remarkable storyteller whose career has spanned five continents and more than six decades. Packed with fascinating anecdotes, African Rhythms is Weston’s life story, as told by him to the music journalist Willard Jenkins. It encompasses Weston’s childhood in Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood—where his parents and other members of their generation imbued him with pride in his African heritage—and his introduction to jazz and early years as a musician in the artistic ferment of mid-twentieth-century New York. His music has taken him around the world: he has performed in eighteen African countries, in Buddhist temples and Shinto shrines, in the Canterbury Cathedral, and at the grand opening of the Bibliotheca Alexandrina: The New Library of Alexandria. Africa is at the core of Weston’s music and spirituality. He has traversed the continent on a continuous quest to learn about its musical traditions, produced its first major jazz festival, and lived for years in Morocco, where he opened a popular jazz club, the African Rhythms Club, in Tangier. . .

Remembering Jim Crow / Abbey Lincoln—Africa / John Coltrane—Africa 1/2 / John Coltane—Africa 2/2 / Peter Tosh—Mama AfricaDr. Alban—Born in Africa

 

 

Prince's The Rainbow Children

Reaches for a Higher Musical Mantle

A Review by C. Liegh McInnis

Blues as Secularized Spirituals  / Cocaine and the Blues

Bettye LaVette Sings “Salt of the Earth”  /  Josephine Baker—Black is Beautiful  /  Josephine Baker's Banana Dance  / Josephine Baker (1927)

Young, Gifted, and Black

The Genius of Weldon Irvine

Music Commentary by Kalamu ya Salaam

Angélique Kidjo Interview

Angélique Kidjo is a Grammy Award-winning Beninoise singer-songwriter and activist, noted for her diverse musical influences and creative music videos. Kidjo was born in Cotonou, Benin. Her father is from the Fon people of Ouidah and her mother from the Yoruba people. She grew up listening to Beninese traditional music, Miriam Makeba, James Brown, Otis Redding, Jimi Hendrix, Stevie Wonder, and Santana. By the time she was six, Kidjo was performing with her mother's theatre troupe, giving her an early appreciation for traditional music and dance. She started singing in her school band Les Sphinx and found success as a teenager with her adaptation of Miriam Makeba's "Les Trois Z" which played on national radio. She recorded the album Pretty with the Cameroonian producer Ekambi Brilliant and her brother Oscar. It featured the songs Ninive, Gbe Agossi and a tribute to the singer Bella Bellow, one of her role models. The success of the album allowed her to tour all over West Africa. Wikipedia

 

 New Amerykah Part Two

Return Of The Ankh by Erykah Badu

Reviewed by Michael Gonzales

 

Report on the 10th National Black Writers Conference (Eugene B. Redmond) / Eighty Moods of Maya  / Images and Homages

 

White Boy Music

By Michael Gonzales

 

New Amerykah Part Two:Return Of The Ankh by Erykah Badu

 

Origins of the Moonwalk Michael Jackson Dies at 50 Comments from Music Lovers

Father of hip-hop, Gil Scott-Heron is a survivor

By Jonathan Takiff

In the late 1960s and '70s, there were none hipper or signifying more on the conscious black arts scene than Gil Scott-Heron. The Lincoln University- and Johns Hopkins-educated poet, author and English professor also discovered his voice as a dramatically throaty, impassioned jazz- and blues-tinged singer. Though he has just released the long-overdue album I'm New Here, he was nurturing a modern neo-soul sound long before the style had a name. And if you ask any of the world's most relevant rappers — from Chuck D to Common — who inspired them, odds are good they'll cite this guy. HoustonChronicle  / Gil Scott-Heron & His Music  / Gil Scott-Heron "Blue Collar"

Fela Kuti—Teacher Don't teach Me No Nonsense

There's lots of discussion these days about Fela Kuti., A play about him is currently running on Broadway. Remarkably, it has been commented, Americans not knowing who Fela Kuti was is like Americans not knowing who Bob Marley was. Yet most Americans have never heard of Fela Kuti. If you've heard of him or if you haven't below is a typically great performance by him. When I saw him in the early 1970's in Berkeley, I was overwhelmed by the sheer numbers of performers and dancers on stage.

— Jean Damu

Fela Anikulapo Kuti (15 October 1938 – 2 August 1997), or simply Fela, was a Nigerian multi-instrumentalist musician and composer, pioneer of afrobeat music, human rights activist, and political maverick.[1] James Brown cited him as one of the originators of funk.--Wikipedia

Breath of Life Hosted by  Kalamu ya Salaam 

 

Hale Smith, Who Broke Borders of Classical and Jazz, Is Dead at 84

Hale Smith, a classical composer who also worked as a performer and arranger with jazz greats like Dizzy Gillespie and Chico Hamilton, died Tuesday at his home in Freeport, L.I. He was 84 [born on June 29, 1925, in Cleveland]. . . . He composed serial-influenced works like “Contours for Orchestra” (1961) and “Ritual and Incantations” (1974), lyrical works like the song cycle “The Valley Wind” (1952) and jingles and incidental music for radio, television and theater. With the drummer Chico Hamilton, he composed the film score for “Mr. Ricco” (1975), and his skill as an orchestrator led to a series of collaborations with the pianist Ahmad Jamal. . . . Eclectic in his tastes and interests, Mr. Smith composed works that ranged from the richly dissonant orchestral composition “Innerflexions” (1977) to “Dialogues and Commentary” (1990-91), a witty set of variations for septet on a single motif. His arrangements of spirituals were performed often by the sopranos Kathleen Battle and Jessye Norman. In 2000, Composers Recordings released a survey of his work, “Music of Hale Smith.” NYTimes

The Music of Hale Smith

Thelonious Monk

 The Life and Times of an American Original

By Robin Kelley

In the first book on Thelonious Monk based on exclusive access to the Monk family papers and private recordings, as well as on a decade of prodigious research, prize-winning historian Robin D. G. Kelley brings to light a startlingly different Thelonious Monk—witty, intelligent, generous, politically engaged, brutally honest, and a devoted father and husband. Indeed, Thelonious Monk is essentially a love story. It is a story of familial love, beginning with Monk's enslaved ancestors from whom Thelonious inherited an appreciation for community, freedom, and black traditions of sacred and secular song. It is about a doting mother who scrubbed floors to pay for piano lessons and encouraged her son to follow his dream. It is the story of romance, from Monk's initial heartbreaks to his lifelong commitment to his muse, the extraordinary Nellie Monk. And it is about his unique friendship with the Baroness Nica de Koenigswarter, a scion of the famous Rothschild family whose relationship with Monk and other jazz musicians has long been the subject of speculation and rumor. Simon and Schuster / Monk As a Rock Star?

Medgar Evers a Mississippian Martyr  /  Scott Sisters Celebrate Freedom  /  Inside New York's Art World: Romare BeardenThe Feminist Wire

Sam and Dave

By Kalamu ya Salaam  

May 18, 2009

Ernie K-Doe: The Emperor of New Orleans R&B  /  If you Want Me To Stay (Sly Stone)

 

Seneca Turner's Thoughts upon Revisiting Hip Hop

A Rejoinder Beyond Either/Or Thinking

By Floyd W Hayes, III

 April 28, 2009

Mister Jelly Roll: The Fortunes of Jelly Roll Morton

New Orleans Creole and "Inventor of Jazz"

By Alan Lomax

When it appeared in 1950, this biography of Ferdinand "Jelly Roll" Morton became an instant classic of jazz literature. Now back in print and updated with a new afterword by Lawrence Gushee, Mister Jelly Roll will enchant a new generation of readers with the fascinating story of one of the world's most influential composers of jazz. Jelly Roll's voice spins out his life in something close to song, each sentence rich with the sound and atmosphere of the period in which Morton, and jazz, exploded on the American and international scene. This edition includes scores of Jelly Roll's own arrangements, a discography and an updated bibliography, a chronology of his compositions, a new genealogical tree of Jelly Roll's forebears, and Alan Lomax's preface from the hard-to-find 1993 edition of this classic work. Lawrence Gushee's afterword provides new factual information and reasserts the importance of this work of African American biography to the study of jazz and American culture.

The 5th L is a Baltimore-based but nationally traveled spoken-word poetry group which is made up of David Ross/Native Son and Femi Lawal/The Dri Fish. They are an action packed spoken word experience that delivers spoken word performances with the skilled theatrics of a Broadway show and the high energy a rap artist exerts on stage and yet are able to maintain the poetic integrity of Langston Hughes to entertain and enlighten audiences. As a duo, they have shared stages with international recording artists such as Musiq Soulchild, Saul Williams, Ursula Rucker, Raheem DeVaughn, Fertile Ground, Jaguar Wright, and KRS-One. The 5th L is not only skilled in performance poetry, but are known to host events as well as their own venues. They have committed their talents to avidly introducing creative writing & dramatic reading to elementary through high school students, afterschool programs, detention centers and facilitate a violence intervention program at The University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center (VIP). The 5th L has a passion for artistic expression and with their words they intend to inspire the planet in a positive way using their lyrical content to provoke thought. WWW.5thL.COM

The rock legend Jimi Hendrix was murdered by his manager, who stood to collect millions of dollars on the star's life insurance policy, a former roadie has claimed in a new book. James "Tappy" Wright says that Hendrix's manager, Michael Jeffrey, drunkenly confessed to killing him by stuffing pills into his mouth and washing them down with several bottles of red wine because he feared Hendrix intended to dump him for a new manager, according to a report in the Mail on Sunday. In his book, Rock Roadie, Mr Wright says Jeffrey told him in 1971 that Hendrix had been "worth more to him dead than alive" as he had taken out a life insurance policy on the musician worth $2m (about £1.2m at the time), with himself as the beneficiary. Two years later, Jeffrey was killed in a plane crash. Hendrix died in September 1970, aged 27. An ambulance crew found his body in the Samarkand Hotel, west London, in the room of a woman called Monika Dannemann, whom he had known for only a few days. Hendrix was alone in the room, lying on his back, with the gas fire on and the door open. There was no record of who had called the ambulance. His inquest recorded the cause of his death as barbiturate intoxication and inhalation of vomit, and recorded an open verdict.  Independent.

 

Aretha Franklin Touches Us Inside / O'JAYS  "For The Love Of Money"

Did you know April is . . .

Jazz Recognition Month

We highlight Max Roach and Abbey Lincoln

Buy a special gift or treat yourself -- Visit Our Store (Books, DVDs, Music)

Check out Be-Mo-Jazz

Michael A. Gonzales: Slow Down Heart  / Why Chesiel Matters   /  Barry Michael Cooper  --  Screenwriter for New Jack City, Above the Rim, & Sugar Hill

Odetta, Voice of Civil Rights Movement, Dies at 77

“You’re walking down life’s road, society’s foot is on your throat, every which way you turn you can’t get from under that foot. And you reach a fork in the road and you can either lie down and die, or insist upon your life.”

Songs Odetta sings   Her recordings of blues and ballads   Odetta’s voice

One Mississippi, Two Mississippi: John Hurt. Fred McDowell

By Kalamu ya Salaam

Philly's Clef Club of Jazz Is On The Upswing ( Junious Ricardo Stanton)

This tremendous educational documentary from the mid-1970s examines the priceless contributions of African-Americans to musical heritage, so closely tied to their unique history in the United States. From Africa upon slave ships captive immigrants brought with them melodies, cadences, and rhythms that inarguably gave rise to music considered 'modern' today. 

Beginning with the genius Louis Armstrong and his triumphant return to Ghana in the late 1950s, this film traces the evolution of music from West Africa to the Virginia colonies of the early 1600s.

 Over the next 400 years, as this distinct root of

Black Music

 in America

in the

mid-1970s 

 

 American culture takes hold, incredible clips of filmed performances by Mahalia Jackson, Josephine Baker, Bessie Smith, Count Basie, Billie Holiday, Coleman Hawkins, Roy Eldridge, and Duke Ellington illustrate the black experience. Contemporary musicians such as Nina Simone, BB King, Cannonball Adderly (w/ Joe Zawinal - Mercy, Mercy, Mercy), and Sly & the Family Stone, along with a funky-ass filmed number from an as-yet-undocumented-on-the-internet off-Broadway production called "The Me Nobody Knew" punctuate the memory of the past, the spontaneity of the moment and determination for the future.   weirdovideo

The Passing of South African Folksinger Miriam Makeba

Chocolate Milk: "Action Speaks Louder Than Words”  / Dee Dee Bridgewater—Afro Blue

 

John ColtraneBlue Train

BoL -- Music Commentary by Mtume & Kalamu ya Salaam

The World of RapGrand Master Flash & The Furious Five

John William Coltrane  Albums --  Ascension  /  Ballads  /  Best of John Coltrane / Impressions  /  My Favorite Things  / Selflessness A Love Supreme /

Giant Steps  / Meditations  / Kulu Se Mama  /  Interstellar Space  / The Complete Africa/Brass Sessions  / Stellar Regions  / Expression   

The World of RapGrand Master Flash & The Furious Five

BoL -- Music Commentary by Mtume & Kalamu ya Salaam

Chick Webb: Baltimore's Jazz Giant  by Amin Sharif  / Breath of Life: A Conversation about Black Music

Rebirth Brass Band "Do Whatcha Wanna (Part 3)"

Commentary on "Second Lining in Treme" by Mtume ya Salaam & Kalamu ya Salaam

A Sun Show Done Up Like The Kitchen Sink

Breath of Life Music Commentary by Mtume ya Salaam &  Kalamu ya Salaam

Bad Brains: Greatest Band in Punk Rock By Vince Rogers

Remembering Fela Anikulapo-Kuti

By Hakeem Babalola

Andy Bey Steady Burning Black Light  /  Kings of Crunk  (Vince Rogers)  /  Master P, Hip-Hop Entrepreneur (Kam Williams)

George Augustus Polgreen Bridgetower, 1780-1860

Prof. Dominique-René de Lerma

Lawrence University, Appleton, Wisconsin

Boogie Down Productions: Rhythms, Rhymes, & Other Theories -- Music Commentary by Mtume ya Salaam & Kalamu ya Salaam

Shaft: Isaac Hayes' Revolutionary Soundtrack

By Michael A. Gonzales

Why Greg Tate Matters

A Love From Outer Space

By Michael A. Gonzales

Terence Blanchard: "Ghost of Congo Square"  / Billie Holiday Strange Fruit

 

Gil Scott-Heron "Blue Collar"

Breath of Life Music Commentary by Mtume ya Salaam & Kalamu ya Salaam

Black History (audio) by Gil Scott-Heron  /  Gil Scott-Heron & His Music Reviews by Mtume ya Salaam & Kalamu ya Salaam

Funkadelic "Cosmic Slop" & "Maggot Brain"  / Eluard A. Burt II Obituary  / For Eluard on his Birthday / Concert sauvage dans le métro!

 

Kind of Blue: The Revolution Recorded

Breath of Life Music Commentary by Mtume ya Salaam & Kalamu ya Salaam

Miles  (poem)  miles davis (poem)  Miles Davis Poem (Kalamu)

Giant Steps was recorded April 1, 1959. Kind of Blue was recorded April 6, 1959. April fool, Trane had been there and done that before Miles. --Kalamu

Treat It Gentle: An Autobiography

By Sidney Bechet

One of the most eloquent autobiographies ever written by an American artist.—Martin Williams

A legend on both the clarinet and the soprano saxophone, one of the most brilliant exponents of New Orleans jazz, Sidney Bechet (1897–1959) played with such fellow jazz legends as Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, and Jelly Roll Morton. Here is his vivid story written in his own words. Expressive, frank, and hilarious, this classic in jazz literature re-creates a man, a music, and an era.  Bechet led a colorful life from New Orleans in the early days of jazz to France where he finally earned the recognition he deserved.. . .John Chilton’s biography, Sidney Bechet: The Wizard of Jazz, makes a good companion piece, filling in the gaps and providing musical analysis.

 

Jazz Poems

By Roger Singer

Weldon Irvine Dead at  59 / The Edification of Weldon Irvine

Home   ChickenBones Store  (Books, DVDs, Music, and more)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bebop, Modernism & Change

A Course by  Dr. Floyd Hayes, III

Revolutionary Black Music: Max Roach and Abbey Lincoln / We Insist! Max Roach's Freedom Now Suite

Blue Note: A History of Modern Jazz ( Reviewed by Amin Sharif    /    A Blues for the Birmingham Four  

Home   ChickenBones Store  (Books, DVDs, Music, and more)

 

 

 

 

 

When Music is a Poet's Tool: Tame turmoil. Transform all the bile-flavored anger and anxiety into words. Vent. Review the outburst to discover the pattern the turmoil never told you it had. Reshape the pattern into stanzas or lyrics, dramatic monologues, and narratives. Polish. Repolish. Publish. There are times when poems must respond  to natural disasters and subsequent pandemics to the reflux acid of war, racism, genocide. At those times, it is only normal for poets to let the turmoil roll. If you want a poem rather than the droppings of a vatic pigeon, you must dance in a music that takes you to the other side of natural disaster and national tragedy. Jerry Ward, Jr., "The Katrina Papers," DrumVoices, Spring-Summer-Fall 2006  Ray Charles Chronology 1930-2004  Breath of Life

 

AfriClassical.com: Song of a New Race     Arturo Sandoval in Baltimore   Muddy Waters on PBS   Blue Note

Gary Bartz Ntu Troop “People Dance”

Breath of Life Music Commentary by Mtume ya Salaam & Kalamu ya Salaam

Didn't He Ramble  for Charles "Buddy" Bolden /      Buddy Bolden in New Orleans   /   Ode to a Magic City (poem)

Jazz Drummer Max Roach Dies -- Maxwell Roach, a  founder of Modern Jazz—born on 10 January 1924, in the small town of New Land, N.C., grew up in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn—died 16 August 2007 in Manhattan. . . . "It all comes down to originality," Roach told jazz critic Leonard Feather some years ago. . . . “There was one unforgettable night when I worked with Pres [Lester Young] at Birdland. Because I was with Pres, and because he and Papa Jo Jones were so close in the Basie band, I played all of Papa Jo's old licks. At the end of the evening, after I said good night to Pres, he gave me one of those succinct lessons in that personal language of his. He said, 'You can't join the throng until you write your own song. . . .That's a great lesson, something that stays with you the rest of your life; this music allows you, prefers you to be an individual, to do your own thing." Revolutionary Black Music: Max Roach and Abbey Lincoln / We Insist! Max Roach's Freedom Now Suite Funeral -- Friday, August 24th at Riverside Church in Manhattan.  Viewing will be at 9 AM.  Services at 11 AM

  Yusef Komunyakaa: Blues Chant Hoodoo Revival  /  Copacetic Mingus   /      Elegy for Thelonious

 

Modern Jazz Quartet

At the Forefront of Experimental Jazz

By Kalamu ya Salaam

Photos of Burial Service of Fathia Nkrumah

Bio-Chronology of Sun Ra Composer and Arranger  /   New School Arkestra  in Concert with Sun Ra

Taj Mahal and The Pointer Sisters

Collaborate Recreating Blues Classics

Breath of Life Music Commentary by Kalamu ya Salaam

Malcolm X on Front Page Challenge, 1965  / Assocition on the Study of African African Life and history  /  Dr. John Henrik Clarke—A Great and Mighty Walk

Summer Madness and Jungle Boogie with Kool and The Gang

Music Commentary by Mtume ya Salaam & Kalamu ya Salaam

--from Breath of Life

   Jane Musoke-Nteyafas:  WHERE IS THE LOVE OF ALL THINGS AFRICAN?   / Women’s Role in Hip Hop

 

Marvin Gaye and The Star Spangled Banner

By Mtume ya Salaam, Breath of Life Music Commentary

Live Performance at the NBA All-Star Game (1983)
video of the performance

Didn't He Ramble    Buddy Bolden in New Orleans    Ode to a Magic City // Blues Chant Hoodoo Revival   Copacetic Mingus

Home   ChickenBones Store  (Books, DVDs, Music, and more)

 

 

 

 

 

CDs of Charlie Parker

The Essential Charlie Parker  /  Charlie Parker: A Studio Chronicle 1940-1948  / Charlie Parker with Strings /

Diz 'N Bird at Carnegie Hall  / The Best of Charlie Parker  /  Jazz at Massey Hall  / Boss Bird

South of the Border  /  Confirmation  / Ornithology YardBird Suite

Herbie Hancock: From Mozart to Headhunters  / Pop Culture Considered as an Uphill Bicycle Race

 

 

Elvin Jones Jazz Drummer

By Etheridge Knight

 

And Then Again / The Truth  / Elvin! Heavy Sounds  / Brother John  / Dear John C 

Books on Rap & Hip Hop

Todd Boyd, The New H.N.I.C.: The Death of Civil Rights and the Reign of Hip Hop (2003) / Sharif Responds to Todd Boyd / Is Hip Hop Really Dead?

Brian Cross, It's Not About a Salary... Rap, Race and Resistance in Los Angeles: Rap, Race, and Resistance in Los Angeles (1993)

Tricia Rose, Black Noise: Rap Music and Black Culture in Contemporary America (1994)

Russell A. Porter,  Spectacular Vernaculars: Hip-Hop and the Politics of Postmodernism (1995)

Bakari Kitwana, The Hip Hop Generation: Young Blacks and the Crisis in African American Culture (2003)

Imani Perry,  Prophets of the Hood: Politics and Poetics in Hip Hop (2004)

 

James Brown Philosophizing on Escapeism

Music Commentary by Mtume ya Salaam & Kalamu ya Salaam

--from Breath of Life

  James Brown and Pavarotti   Naturally Seven

 James Brown Philosophizing    James Brown Messing with the Blues  Long Live the Kings of Black Entertainment   The Man Who Named A People (Glen Ford)

 Duet for The Godfather (Wordslanger)  Climbing Malcolm's Ladder  Music  James Brown  & More James Brown on YouTube

 

Hail! Odetta: Seminal Matriarch of Modern Black Music

Looking for a Home Reviewed by Mtume ya Salaam & Kalamu ya Salaam

--from Breath of Life

 

  Music  Musicians

Tim Berens Interviews Jimmy Ponder  Introduction by Amin Sharif  / The Queen Dinah Washington  / Billie Holiday, Strange Fruit

That’s The Way Of The World

Earth, Wind & Fire Reviewed by Mtume ya Salaam & Kalamu ya Salaam

--from Breath of Life

Weldon Irvine Dead at  59       The Edification of Weldon Irvine

 

Revolutionary Black Music: Max Roach and Abbey Lincoln

We Insist! Max Roach's Freedom Now Suite & Other Albums

Reviewed by Mtume ya Salaam & Kalamu ya Salaam

--from Breath of Life

Straight Ahead  / A Turtle’s Dream  /  When There Is Love / Abbey Sings Billie

Hip-hop is dead--Data from the "Black Youth Project" indicated that while 58 percent of blacks between ages 15 and 25 listen to hip-hop daily, most are dissatisfied with it. They find the subject matter is too violent, and women too often portrayed in offensive ways. Such feelings hint at a dirty little secret of the music business: Blacks are used largely to validate musical themes being marketed to the white mainstream. In other words, while 90 percent of commercial rap artists on TV and radio are black, the target audience lies outside the black community. Paul Porter, a longtime industry veteran and former music programmer at BET and Radio One, is now with the watchdog organization Industry Ears. He says the University of Chicago findings offer proof positive that commercial hip-hop has become the ultimate minstrel show, and rap artists are pushed by the industry to remain perpetual adolescents. As a result, we watch Diddy, Cam'ron, DMX and others brag about wealth and throw bills at a camera while bikini-clad women gyrate in the background. Should these artists attempt to break out of the mold, they'd risk having their work questioned by record and radio executives. DaveyD,Commerce is killing the true spirit of hip-hop.” Mercury News

WAR:  "Slippin' into Darkness"

All Day Music Reviewed by Mtume ya Salaam & Kalamu ya Salaam

--from Breath of Life

Breath of Life Music Commentary by Mtume ya Salaam & Kalamu ya Salaam  WAR   /   "Body and Soul"  / Nina Simone / Bob Marley /  Alice Coltrane /               James Brown  / Staple Singers  /  Police Brutality and Rappers  / Luther Vandross  /  Music & Musicians

 

"Body and Soul" Once Banned from Radio

Leading Ballad for Jazz Instrumentalists

Reviewed by Mtume ya Salaam & Kalamu ya Salaam

--from Breath of Life

 Coleman Hawkins  Lester Young  Sarah Vaughan  Charles Mingus  Betty Carter  Cassandra Wilson  Dexter Gordon  John Coltrane  

Ode to a Magic City  & Didn't He Ramble  by Rudolph Lewis  / Buddy Bolden in New Orleans

 

Nina Simone: The Emotional Depths of the Spirit World

Emergency Ward  Reviewed by Mtume ya Salaam & Kalamu ya Salaam

Songs of Freedom and Spirit   /   Anthology  / The Essential Nina Simone  /   Sugar In My Bowl  / The Blues / Compact Jazz: Nina Simone

Nina Simone: A Bio- Chronology   Remembering Nina  Four Women  To be Young, Gifted and Black  Well Done, Miss Simone   Nina Remembers  An Angelic Trio

 

Beethoven, the Black Spaniard

By Deborah D. Moseley

The Great Fugue   “Waldstein” Sonata   “Emperor” Piano Concerto   “Choral” Symphony

Deborah D. Moseley:  Sam Cooke and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart    Review of Amiri Baraka's Essence of Reparations 

 Bob Marley: The Black Survivors

Reviews of Survival  by Mtume ya Salaam & Kalamu ya Salaam

 Marley albums: Catch a Fire  /  Rastaman Vibration  /  Uprising  /  Exodus  /  Kaya  /  Survival

Komunyakaa Blues/jazz poems --    Blues Chant Hoodoo Revival   Copacetic Mingus   Elegy for Thelonious  Woman, I Got the Blues

Jazz Singer Ruby GloverThe Little Giant of Pennsylvania Avenue—Passes

By Alvin Kirby Brunson

Bad Brains: Greatest Band in Punk Rock (By Vince Rogers)

I Against I (1986)   /   Quickness (1989)    /     Banned in DC: Bad Brains Greatest Riffs (2003)

Weldon Irvine Obituary   Weldon Irvine Documentary   CDs by Weldon Irvine  Liberated Brother / Sinbad  /  Spirit Man  /  Time Capsule / Cosmic Vortex  / 

Keyboards Wild DJs Smile  / Time Capsule / Music Is the Key  /  The Price of Freedom

Home   ChickenBones Store  (Books, DVDs, Music, and more)

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Divine Music of Alice Coltrane

Music Reviews by Mtume ya Salaam & Kalamu ya Salaam

--from Breath of Life 

   Alice Coltrane albums: Journey in Satchidananda  / Translinear Light  /  Ptah the El Daoud  / A Monastic Trio / Transfiguration

Bio-Chronology of Sun Ra Composer and Arranger      New School Arkestra  in Concert with Sun Ra Alumni / Long Live the Kings of Black Entertainment 

 

James Brown -- Messing with the Blues

Music Commentary by Mtume ya Salaam & Kalamu ya Salaam

--from Breath of Life

 Live at the Apollo  /  Messing with the Blues / 20 All-time Greatest Hits Star Time  / 50th Anniversary Collection / Foundations of Funk

Long Live the Kings of Black Entertainment  The Man Who Named A People (Glen Ford)  Duet for The Godfather (Wordslanger)  Climbing Malcolm's Ladder 

The Best of the Staple Singers, as BAM Artists

Music Commentary by Mtume ya Salaam & Kalamu ya Salaam

--from Breath of Life

The Best of The Staple Singers  / Let's Do It Again / Freedom Highway / Pray On, My Child  /  Be Altitude: Respect Yourself  / Soul Folk in Action

Florence Mills: Harlem Jazz Queen By Bill Egan / Florence Mills: A Lost Treasure

 

Bakari Kitwana, a former editor at The Source, identifies blacks born between 1965 and 1984 as belonging to the "hip-hop generation" a term he uses interchangeably with black youth culture ("Generation X" applies mainly to whites, he says). He calls hip-hop "arguably the single most significant achievement of our generation," yet blames it for causing much damage to black youth by perpetuating negative stereotypes and providing poor role models. Bakari Kitwana, The Hip Hop Generation

Police Brutality and Rappers

Music Commentary by Mtume ya Salaam & Kalamu ya Salaam

    Ghetto Music: The Blueprint Of Hip Hop (Jive, 1989)  /  Get Rich Or Die Tryin’ – Soundtrack (2005) / Straight Outta Compton (Priority, 1988)   

The Staying Power of Rap  On Hiphop and Musicology (Jonathan Scott)  Enough with the Poisonous Lyrics Women’s Role in Hip Hop (Jane Musoke-Nteyafas)

Hip Hop 101 Droppin' Knowledge  (Junious Ricardo Stanton)  /    50 Cent: A Metaphor for Change   A Hip Hop Clothing Store

Poor White Boys and the Future of Hiphop By Charles Chea  Is Hip Hop Really Dead? (Rahim & Sharif)   Maxine Waters: The Hip Hop Symposium Interview

Graffiti Takeover    /  Dogs for Life   /   The Coup Music    George Bush Doesn't Care   Freddie Foxxx

Let That Bad Air Out: Buddy Bolden's Last Parade

A Novel in Linocut by Stefan Rerg

In a series of brilliantly rendered linocut relief prints, Berg tells the story of Buddy Bolden, a New Orleans jazz musician living from 1877 to 1931. Each crisp image masterfully succeeds in evoking a feeling of the fluidity of the music, the boisterousness of the community, and the darkness of the events surrounding the musician's demise. An introduction by Donald M. Marquis, author of In Search of Buddy Bolden: First Man of Jazz, and an afterword by renowned artist, George A. Walker, round out this collection.

Fans of the graphic novel genre and enthusiasts of linocut relief printmaking will surely be pleased with Let That Bad Air Out: Buddy Bolden's Last Parade. Highly recommended. Stefan Berg revives the wordless graphic novel in his portrait of he `first man of jazz'. Very little is known of Buddy Bolden. His music was never recorded and there is only one existing photograph, yet he is considered to be the first bandleader to play the improvised music that has since become known as jazz.

Hip-hop is dead--Data from the "Black Youth Project" indicated that while 58 percent of blacks between ages 15 and 25 listen to hip-hop daily, most are dissatisfied with it. They find the subject matter is too violent, and women too often portrayed in offensive ways. Such feelings hint at a dirty little secret of the music business: Blacks are used largely to validate musical themes being marketed to the white mainstream. In other words, while 90 percent of commercial rap artists on TV and radio are black, the target audience lies outside the black community. Paul Porter, a longtime industry veteran and former music programmer at BET and Radio One, is now with the watchdog organization Industryears.com. He says the University of Chicago findings offer proof positive that commercial hip-hop has become the ultimate minstrel show, and rap artists are pushed by the industry to remain perpetual adolescents. As a result, we watch Diddy, Cam'ron, DMX and others brag about wealth and throw bills at a camera while bikini-clad women gyrate in the background. Should these artists attempt to break out of the mold, they'd risk having their work questioned by record and radio executives. DaveyD,Commerce is killing the true spirit of hip-hop.” Mercury News

The Last Poets were formed on May 19, 1968 (Malcolm X's birthday), at Marcus Garvey Park (formerly Mount Morris Park, at 124th Street and Fifth Avenue) in the East Harlem neighborhood of New York City. The original members were Felipe Luciano, Gylan Kain, and David Nelson. The group continued to evolve via a 1969 Harlem writers' workshop known as "East Wind." Jalal Mansur Nuriddin, Umar Bin Hassan, and Abiodun Oyewole, along with percussionist Nilaja, are generally considered the primary and core members of the group, as they appeared in the group's 1970 self-titled debut . . ..Luciano, Kain, and Nelson recorded separately as "The Original Last Poets," gaining some renown as the soundtrack artists for the 1971 film "Right On!" . . . . With jazz or funk as a backdrop, percussions rolling and words shooting out like bursts of machine gun fire, the group denounces the oppression of African Americans, while painting a devastating yet humorous picture of life in the ghetto. Nearly forty years after their separation, the members of this legendary group—the founding fathers of today's hip hop, rap and slam—come together in Paris for a one-time concert at the 2008 Banlieues Bleues Festival. The Last Poets: Made in Amerikkka is a film that erases the boundaries between different genres. It's a live recording, a musical documentary and an art film, all combined into one, and yet it goes beyond any of these. It is a film event, faithful to the spirit and the image of The Last Poets. Umar Bin Hassan, and Abiodun Oyewole still perform under the name "The Last Poets."Wikipedia

I want my life to work towards a better world each and everyday I live. I might not see man evolve to this higher place in my lifetime, but I want to serve in some small part in making it happen. -- John Blake   Rudy Interviews John Blake, Jazz Violinist Quest (1995)  / Epic Ebony Journey (1997)  /  A New Beginning (1990)

Sam Cooke and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart    

By Deborah D. Moseley

 Sam Cooke with the Soul Stirrers  / Portrait of a Legend 1951-1964  / Sam Cook Greatest Hits / 16 Most Requested Songs

Mozart: 46 Symphonies  /  The Piano Concertos  /  Piano Sonatas  /  The Marriage of Figaro

Don't talk about it / Be about it: Last Friday, Mos Def was outside of the VMA's (Video Music Awards) rapping his Katrina song,  Dollar Day--Katrina Klap   and he was arrested by the NYPD."   /  George Bush Doesn't Care  (Legendary KO lyrics) George Bush Don't Like Black People (Audio) /  Papoose-50-shots/

Rahsaan Dead at Forty-One

Poem by Rudolph Lewis

The Best of Rahsaan  Roland Kirk

 Blacknuss  /  Volunteered Slavery  / Bright Moments  / Brotherman in the Fatherland The Inflated Tear

 

When Jazz Ain't Jazz

Transition of Rufus Harley

 By Marvin X

50 Cent: A Metaphor for Change (By Intel)

Get Rich Or Die Tryin'  /  The Massacre   / Guess Who's Back  / Power of the Dollar

Send contributions to: ChickenBones: A Journal /  13219 Kientz Road / Jarratt, VA 23867  -- I became aware of Rudy Lewis’ labor of love a few short months ago during a visit to Kalamu ya Salaam’s e-drum listserv. As soon as I saw the title of the journal I knew it was about Black folks, and the power of the written word.  A quick click took me into a journal that’s long on creativity, highlighting well-known, little known, and a little known writers, and commitment to the empowerment of Black folks. I contacted Rudy to ask if he’d consider publishing some of my work. His response was immediate, and a couple of days after I’d forwarded some poems to him—they were part of ChickenBones. What I didn’t know was that this journal has been surviving for the last five years with very little outside financial support. . .  If we want journals like this to “thrive” we need to support them with more than our website hits, praise, and submissions for publication consideration.

—Peace, Mary E. Weems (January 2007)                     

 

Breath of Life Presents

Gil Scott-Heron & His Music

Reviews by Mtume ya Salaam & Kalamu ya Salaam

 

 From South Africa To South Carolina (Arista 1976)  Winter In America (Strata-East 1974)  Pieces Of A Man (Flying Dutchman 1971)

For true jazz is an art of individual assertion within and against the group. Each true jazz moment (as distinct from the uninspired commercial performance) springs from a contest in which each artist challenges all the rest; each solo flight or improvisation, represents . . . a definition of his identity, as member of the collective, and as a link in the chain of tradition. Ralph Ellison, "The Charlie Christian Story," Saturday Review of Literature ( May 17, 1950), p. 42.
Ellis Marsalis, Jr. Bio

Ellis Marsalis on Wednesday at Snug Harbor

By Lee Grue

 

Marsalis albums: Duke in Blue  /  Loved Ones  /  Joe Cool's Blues  /  The Marsalis Family  / Piano in E-Solo Piano  / Heart of Gold

Raymond Myles, “Heaven is the Place”  A Gospel for Now on Breath of Life ( BOL)

"I Know what it means to miss New Orleans"

Funeralizing Mahalia   A Gospel for New Orleans

Mahalia Jackson: Saturday Night Rhythms 

and Sunday Morning Lyrics

By Cornish Rogers

 Gospels . . . Hymns   /  The Best of Mahalia Jackson  /  Black, Brown and Beige   / Best Loved Spirituals

We define Music of the Spirit as an art form that defies times, genre and culture, even while it, is in fact, identifiably of a specific time frame (20th-21st Century), genre (Jazz) and culture (African American). It comes from within, this Music of the Spirit and it likewise enters into the listener; it is complex in its simplicity and simple in its complexity, a music that can be described as an enigma wrapped up in a paradox.

Its composers, at work in the creation of art, more often than not, do give cognizance to its source, a higher power that many humans refer to as God. Many of us who help to create this music have at some point in our lives, moved away from being limitedly defined by ego to being more broadly defined by spirit, thus moving from me to us, from the individual to the collective, from a group to a movement. Thus the music influences its composers to evolve both spiritually and artistically in order to best express the vocation they’ve embraced. 

-- Ahmed Abdullah and Louis Reyes Rivera

 

Rebecca Malope

South African Gospel Queen

 Free at Last: South African Gospel  / Live at the State Theatre

 C. L. Franklin: Sermonic Closings /  Doubting Thomas / My Favorite Sermons  /  Sermons and Hymns  /  Legendary Sermons Only a Look (with Aretha Franklin) / The Eagle Stirreth in Her Nest  /  And He Went a Little Farther

Duke Ellington

Bio-Chronology

1899-1974

 Duke Ellington and John Coltrane  /  Ellington at Newport  / The Great Summit  / The Count Meets the Duke  / Blues in Orbit

The Very Best of Duke Ellington / Three Suites / Piano Reflections / Far East Suite / Masterpieces-1926-1949 / Money Jungle

 

 

John William Coltrane

Composer, Bandleader, Saxophonist (1926-1967)

 Ascension  /  Ballads  /  Best of John Coltrane / Impressions / My Favorite Things  / Selflessness  / A Love Supreme  / Giant Steps  / Meditations  / Kulu Se Mama  /  Interstellar Space  / The Complete Africa/Brass Sessions  / Stellar Regions  / Expression 

Poems for Trane -- A Love Supreme   Breathing Low & Steady

Home   ChickenBones Store  (Books, DVDs, Music, and more)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Never Too Much An Interview With Luther Ronzoni Vandross, Jr. (Kalamu ya Salaam )

Thousands Bid Farewell to Luther Vandross (Jamie Walker)

 

Never Too Much  /  Forever, For Always, For Love   / Dance with My Father   / Live at Radio City Music  Hall / The Essential Luther Vandross

 Peter  Addo: The Sax Player At The Green Door  Books by Peter Addo  For Kwame Nkrumah  Ghana - A Year Ago       Origins Of African American Spiritualism 

Charles Mingus 

(1922-1979)

Composer, Bandleader, Bassist, Pianist

Mingus Ah Um   / Pithecanthropus Erectus  / The Black Saint & The Sinner Lady Let My Children Hear Music

      Cliff Chandler Poems --  Sir Charles Mingus   The Queen Dinah Washington  Well Done, Miss Simone  / / Copacetic Mingus (Komunyakaa) 

 Music Reviews by Amin Sharif

AfriClassical.com: Song of a New Race     Arturo Sandoval in Baltimore   Muddy Waters on PBS   Blue Note

Blue Note: A History of Modern Jazz             Good Looks          A Blues for the Birmingham Four    

Big Chief Allison "Tootie" Montana  Greatest Triumph  By Marcel Diallo  Source: whatchusay.com                      

  Muddy Waters (1915-1983):A Bio Chronology

Muddy Waters I Can’t Be Satisfied on PBS

Reviewed by Amin Sharif

 

 The Anthology: 1947-1972  /   Can't Get No Grindin'   /  King of Chicago Blues  Electric Mud   At Newport 

It Must Be Lester Young  Poem by E. Ethelbert Miller

Listening to the Blues Is a Duty and Responsibility

Breath of Life Music Commentary by Mtume ya Salaam & Kalamu ya Salaam

Robert Johnson and other Bluesmen

Living Legends

Son House - Skip James - Bukka White - Big Joe Williams

Linear Notes by Brian Van der Horst

The Very Best of Son House  /  The Complete Early Recordings of Skip James  /   Big Joe Williams   / The Complete Bukka White

Negro Spirituals and American Culture By Regina Dolan 

The Spiritual and the Blues

 

Jimmy Scott: If You Only Knew

 A Film Review by Amin Sharif

Jimmy Scott albums: All the Way  /  Mood Indigo  / Lost and Found  /  The Source  / The Fabulous Songs of Jimmy Scott / Someone to Watch Over Me

Books on the Blues

Howard W. Odum and Guy B. Johnson, Negro Workaday Songs (1926) / Samuel Charters, The Country Blues (1959) and The Poetry of the Blues (1963)

Steven Calt, The Country Blues Songbook (1973) / Charles Keil, Urban Blues (1966)  / Peter Guralnick, Feel Like Going Home (1971)

LeRoi Jones, Blues People (1963)  / Steven Tracy, Langston Hughes and the Blues (2001) / Paul Oliver, The Story Of The Blues

Jeff Todd Titon, Early Downhome Blues: A Musical and Cultural Analysis (1995) and Downhome Blues Lyrics: An Anthology from the Post-World War II Era

W. C. Handy. Father of the Blues: An Autobiography / Robert Palmer, Deep Blues: A Musical and Cultural History of the Mississippi Delta

 David Evans Big Road Blues: Tradition and Creativity in the Folk Blues / Eric Sackheim, The Blues Line: Blues Lyrics from Leadbelly to Muddy Waters

Houston A. Baker Jr., Blues, Ideology, and Afro-American Literature: A Vernacular Theory (1987) / Jonathan Scott, Socialist Joy in the Writing of Langston Hughes

 

Booker: Black Night Keeps on Falling

By Lee Meitzen Grue

James Booker Albums: Spiders on the Keys  /  Junco Partner  /  New Orleans Piano Wizard: Live!  / Resurrection of the Bayou Maharajah

Kalamu: Do Right Women: Black Women, Eroticism and Classic Blues /   Raoul's Silver Song /  I Sing Because... / Another Duke Ellington Story 

Related files:  One Hour Mama (Ida CoxFeminism, Black Erotica & Revolutionary Love  Responses to Feminism, Black Erotica, & Revolutionary Love

*   *   *   *   *

Ida Cox—Wild Women Don’t Have the Blues

*   *   *   *   *

Wild Women Don’t Have the Blues
                                       

                                            By Ida Cox


I hear these women raving 'bout their monkey men
About their trifling husbands and their no good friends
These poor women sit around all day and moan
Wondering why their wandering papa's don't come home
But wild women don't worry, wild women don't have no blues

Now when you've got a man, don't never be on the square
'Cause if you do he'll have a woman everywhere
I never was known to treat no one man right
I keep 'em working hard both day and night
'Cause wild women don't worry, wild women don't have their blues

I've got a disposition and a way of my own
When my man starts kicking I let him find another home
I get full of good liquor, walk the streets all night
Go home and put my man out if he don't act right
Wild women don't worry, wild women don't have their blues

You never get nothing by being an angel child
You better change your ways and get real wild
I wanna tell you something, I wouldn't tell you a lie
Wild women are the only kind that ever get by
wild women don't worry, wild women don't have their blues.

Birth name: Ida Prather Born, 25 February 1896

Origin Toccoa, Habersham County, Georgia, United States.

Died 10 November 1967 (aged 71) Genres Jazz, Blues Instruments Vocalist.

 

Miss Marva Wright  Sings Gospel at Rock n' Bowl

By Lee Meitzen Grue

  Blues Queen of New Orleans   /  Do Right Woman  /  Marvalous   /  Bluesiana Mama  /  Born with the Blues  / Heartbreakin Woman

Treat It Gentle: An Autobiography

By Sidney Bechet

One of the most eloquent autobiographies ever written by an American artist.—Martin Williams

A legend on both the clarinet and the soprano saxophone, one of the most brilliant exponents of New Orleans jazz, Sidney Bechet (1897–1959) played with such fellow jazz legends as Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, and Jelly Roll Morton. Here is his vivid story written in his own words. Expressive, frank, and hilarious, this classic in jazz literature re-creates a man, a music, and an era. Bechet led a colorful life from New Orleans in the early days of jazz to France where he finally earned the recognition he deserved.. . .John Chilton’s biography, Sidney Bechet: The Wizard of Jazz, makes a good companion piece, filling in the gaps and providing musical analysis.

Teena Marie Honored at the R&B Foundation Pt 1  / Teena Marie Honored at the R&B Foundation Pt 2  /  Muddy Waters—Blow Wind Blow

Wyclef Jean in live jamming battle with LucreciaKamau Daoud recites poem for Horace Tapscott  / Kamau Daaood  Poem for John Coltrane

Native Son

for Louis "Satchmo" Armstrong)

By Professor ARTURO

Malcolm  Shine and the Titanic   Poem for Our Fathers  Poem for Our Mothers 

Satchmo: My Life in New Orleans   /Armstrong's Trumpet

 Satchmo albums: Best Of Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Armstrong  /  All-Time Greatest Hits  /  The Hot Fives & Sevens  /  The Definitive Collection  The Essential Louis Armstrong

Mister Jelly Roll: The Fortunes of Jelly Roll Morton

New Orleans Creole and "Inventor of Jazz"

By Alan Lomax

When it appeared in 1950, this biography of Ferdinand "Jelly Roll" Morton became an instant classic of jazz literature. Now back in print and updated with a new afterword by Lawrence Gushee, Mister Jelly Roll will enchant a new generation of readers with the fascinating story of one of the world's most influential composers of jazz. Jelly Roll's voice spins out his life in something close to song, each sentence rich with the sound and atmosphere of the period in which Morton, and jazz, exploded on the American and international scene. This edition includes scores of Jelly Roll's own arrangements, a discography and an updated bibliography, a chronology of his compositions, a new genealogical tree of Jelly Roll's forebears, and Alan Lomax's preface from the hard-to-find 1993 edition of this classic work.

Sodi Braide is a 32-year-old Nigerian pianist who brought himself to our attention last year.

We recently learned of his Lyrinx CD of solo piano works of César Franck, released this year,

and read an online interview he gave to Agnès Jourdain . . .  Bill Zick  AfriClassical

Jazz Dance: The Story of American Vernacular Dance

By Marshall Stearns and Jean Stearns

Marshall Stearns, who taught college English, specializing in Chaucer, loved jazz, thought about jazz, taught about jazz, wrote about jazz, and, as the foundation of all this, took jazz seriously. His The Story of Jazz became a standard work in its field, and he then went on to document the dancing that went with the music. With his wife Jean, he spent seven years doing research, not only in libraries but among the living archives of dancers' memories. They conducted interviews with every jazz dancer they could find, at a time when jazz dancers seemed to be members of an endangered species.

Now, thanks to Da Capo Press, Jazz Dance is again available, as a paperback ($16.95), augmented with a new foreword and afterword by Brenda Bufalino, artistic director of the American Tap Dance Orchestra.

We All Live in Jena--National Student Walk-Out to rally and show support for the Jena 6

 National Call to Action! / Monday, October 1, 2007 / 12:00 Noon, Central Time

 For more info contact info@mxgm.org / To add your school to the list, email assata@pitt.edu or spjlewis@hotmail.com  

*   *   *   *   *

Rolling Stone names Jimi Hendrix the ‘Greatest Guitarist of all Time,’—Jim FarberNew York Daily News—Jimi Hendrix has been proclaimed the “Greatest Guitarist of All Time” by a panel of musicians wrangled by Rolling Stone Magazine—Though dead for more than 40 years, Hendrix’s fiery and distinct style clearly continues to inspire, and intimidate, six-string pluckers the world over. “His playing was effortless,” wrote Rage Against The Machine axe man, and poll voter, Tom Morello, in an appreciation of Hendrix’s technique that will be printed in an issue of the magazine out Friday.

“There’s not one minute of his recorded career that feels like he’s working hard at it — it feels like it’s all flowing through him.” Other guitarists in the vaunted list of Top 100 tip heavily towards British players who rose during the ‘60s, eating up the rest of the top five: Eric Clapton (2), Jimmy Page (3), Keith Richards (4) and Jeff Beck (5)—NYDailyNews

Mister Satan's Apprentice A Blues Memoir by Adam Gussow /  Harlem Blues / Mother Mojo / Living on the River  (Reviews) Books by Adam Gussow:   Seems Like Murder Here  / Mister Satan's Apprentice: A Blues Memoir

 

Related Files for Music & Musicians

The Autobiography of Magnificent Montague by Magnificent Montague with Bob Baker

Buddy Bolden

 

     Didn't He Ramble  for Charles "Buddy" Bolden poem by Rudolph Lewis

     Buddy Bolden in New Orleans   by William Russell and Stephen W. Smith

     Ode to a Magic City (poem)

 
 

*   *   *   *   *

Buddy Bolden’s Blues

                      Lyrics by Jelly Roll Morton.

I thought I heard Buddy Bolden say
You nasty, you dirtytake it away
You terrible, you awfultake it away
I thought I heard him say

I thought I heard Buddy Bolden shout
Open up that window and let that bad air out
Open up that window, and let the foul air out
I thought I heard Buddy Bolden say

I thought I heard Judge Fogarty say

Thirty days in the markettake him away

Get him a good broom to sweep withtake him away

I thought I heard him say

 

I thought I heard Frankie Dusen shout

Gal, give me that moneyI’m gonna beat it out

I mean give me that money, like I explain you, or I’m gonna beat it out

I thought I heard Frankie Dusen say

 

 

Charles Mingus (1922-1979) Composer, Bandleader, Bassist, Pianist

 

Fred Wesley Jr.

     Hit Me, Fred

John Coltrane John William Coltrane  (1926-1967) Composer, Bandleader, Saxophonist  Music

    Trane Albums: Ascension  /  Ballads  /  Best of John Coltrane / Impressions / My Favorite Things  / Selflessness  / A Love Supreme  / Giant Steps  Meditations  / Kulu Se Mama  /  Interstellar Space  / The Complete Africa/Brass Sessions  / Stellar Regions  / Expression

 

     Poems

     Breathing Low & Steady  

     A Love Supreme 

Jimmy Scott: If You Only Knew: A Film Review by Amin Sharif

  Jimmy Scott albums: All the Way  /  Mood Indigo  / Lost and Found  /  The Source  / The Fabulous Songs of Jimmy Scott / Someone to Watch Over Me

Junious Ricardo Stanton  Positively Black Table

     Cape May Jazz Festival

     Hip Hop 101 Droppin' Knowledge

 

Wild Women Don’t Have the Blues

                                                         By Ida Cox


I hear these women raving 'bout their monkey men
About their fighting husbands and their no good friends
These poor women sit around all day and moan
Wondering why their wandering papas don't come home
But wild women don't worry, wild women don't have the blues.

Now when you've got a man, don't ever be on the square
'Cause if you do he'll have a woman everywhere
I never was known to treat no one man right
I keep 'em working hard both day and night
because wild women don't worry, wild women don't have no blues.

I've got a disposition and a way of my own
When my man starts kicking I let him find another home
I get full of good liquor, walk the streets all night
Go home and put my man out if he don't act right
Wild women don't worry, wild women don't have no blues

You never get nothing by being an angel child
You better change your ways and get real wild
I wanna tell you something, I wouldn't tell you no lie
Wild women are the only kind that ever get by
Wild women don't worry, wild women don't have no blues.

 Born Ida Prather,25 February 1896 in Toccoa, Habersham County, Georgia, United States. Died 10 November 1967 (aged 71) Genres Jazz, Blues Instruments Vocalist.

 

 

Lee Meitzen Grue

Books by Lee Meitzen Grue:  Goodbye Silver, Silver Cloud   In the Sweet Balance of the Flesh  French Quarter Poems  Three Poets in New Orleans

     Poems

     Billie Pierce 

     Booker: Black Night Keep on Falling  

          James Booker Albums: Spiders on the Keys  /  Junco Partner  /  New Orleans Piano Wizard: Live!  / Resurrection of the Bayou Maharajah

     Ellis Marsalis on Wednesday at Snug Harbor

          Ellis Marsalis albums: Duke in Blue  /  Loved Ones  /  Joe Cool's Blues  /  The Marsalis Family  / Piano in E-Solo Piano  / Heart of Gold

     Jazzmen  

     Miles

     Miss Marva Wright  

              Marva Wright Albums:  Blues Queen of New Orleans   /  Do Right Woman  /  Marvalous   /  Bluesiana Mama  /  Born with the Blues  /  HeartbreakinWoman                                       

     Turbinton: The African Cowboy at Charlie B's

           Earl Turbinton albums: Dominion and Sustenance  /  Brothers for Life  / 

     Walter Washington       

            Walter Washington albums: Funk Is in the House  /  On the Prowl  /  Out of the Dark  /  Sada  /  Blue Moon Risin'  / Wolf at the Door

 

Muddy Waters on PBS by Amin Sharif

         Muddy albums The Anthology: 1947-1972  /  A Tribute to Muddy Waters: King of the Blues  /  King of Chicago Blues  Electric Mud   At Newport  / The Muddy Waters Story  /  Can't Get No Grindin'

 

Nina Simone

      Nina Simone albums:  Forever Young, Gifted & Black: Songs of Freedom and Spirit (2006)  /   Anthology  (2003)   Nina: The Essential Nina Simone  (2000, 2003)  /  The Very Best Of Nina Simone, 1967-1972 : Sugar In My Bowl (1998)  / The Blues (1968, 1991) / Compact Jazz: Nina Simone (1989-1991)

     Bio-Chronology

     Four Women

     Remembering Nina by Amin Sharif

     To Be Young, Gifted and Black  

     Well Done, Miss Simone  A Poem by Cliff Chandler 

 

 

Po-It

     Brotha Soul  

     Himacy

     Lickwid  Langwij A Musical CD 

     Untitled  

 

Rahsaan Roland Kirk 

 

     The Best of Rahsaan  Roland Kirk Linear Notes by Ira Gitler

     Rahsaan Dead at Forty-One  by Rudolph Lewis 

 

Ray Charles Chronology 1930-2004

Sun Ra  

 

     Bio-Chronology of Sun Ra Composer and Arranger

     New School Arkestra  in Concert with Sun Ra Alumni & guest poet Louis Reyes Rivera 

 

Weldon Irvine

 

     Weldon Irvine Dead at  59

     The Edification of Weldon Irvine

 

Yusef Komunyakaa

    

     Blues Chant Hoodoo Revival

     Copacetic Mingus

     Elegy for Thelonious

     Letter to Bob Kaufman

     Woman, I Got the Blues

 

 

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